Photo #1 - My 150 Gallon Saltwater Aquarium. I Wouldn't...

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Submitted By: John on
Photo Caption: MY 150 gallon Saltwater Aquarium. I wouldn't personally call it a reef, (I only have 6 corals) but, by definition it is. Oh, and sorry about the angle, I have the tank positioned so that I couldn't get far enough away from the tank to get a front picture. Also, please let me know what you think. But go easy on me I put alot of work into this.
150 gallons reef tank (mostly live coral and fish) - MY 150 gallon Saltwater Aquarium. I wouldn't personally call it a reef, (I only have 6 corals) but, by definition it is. Oh, and sorry about the angle, I have the tank positioned so that I couldn't get far enough away from the tank to get a front picture. Also, please let me know what you think. But go easy on me I put alot of work into this.

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State: Idaho
Country: United States
Description: 5 ft long by 2ft wide and 2ft high (7 feet with stand). Sump system, magdrive main pump (unsure of model), phosphate reactor (unsure of make) and an ETSS brand protein skimmer (again, unsure of model but it goes for $300) Twin 250watt 10k halide bulbs with 2 48" blue actinic bulbs (which I installed after getting the aquarium). Also, just out of habit I installed an underground filter. No real reason other than airation with my seasscape airpump and powerhead mounts.
Advice: Patience. The first thing to remember is that you have to be patient. This is my 3rd aquarium and believe me, My first tank was horrible because I rushed it. Also, be sure to ask around your town and find a good reliable source of information from a local store. I have 4 stores in my town that carry saltwater fish and only 2 of them were in anyway reliable. Also, many things can be used as a tool, pillow batting makes a handy filter, and a credit card/subway card can make an excellent algae scrubber. Finally, and this is the most important thing I have to offer is for you to never shoot outside of your ring of understanding. If you are just beggining for example trying to keep an achilles tang is just unfair to the animal.
Fish Kept: Hippo Tang, Naso Tang, Sailfin Tang, Bannerfish, Bluechin Trigger, coral Beauty Angelfish, Keyhole Angelfish, 2 Clarkii Clown, 2 Percula Clowns, 12 Green Chromis, and a cleaner wrasse. Invertabretes: 2 Cleaner Srimp, 2 Emerald Crabs, 5 peppermint Shrimps, 1 Burgandy Linkia Starfish, 2 feather duster worms, and a shortspined urchin (He actually came on one of the rocks)
Corals/Plants: 2 Crocea Clams (each about 4 inches), 1 Leather Coral, 2 small colonies of green button polyps, and one small colony of yellow polyps, some sea moss (which is quite nice and colorful in bushes, plus is a great housing for copepods) and some red calerpae which honestly I don't know what it is exactly, I got it on a rock as just a leaf and it flourished (you can see it on the larger rock formation behind the hippo tang). Not really a reef yet, but I'm not exactly working rich so I'm working my way up.
Tank Size: 150 gallons
Quote: Ignorance Is Bliss, And People Like To Be Happy
About Yourself: I first got into the hobby when I was 11 and have been going for almost 7 years now. I started going to a local salt shop that opened near my house and then promptly closed about 7 months later. However, going there left a lasting mark on me. They had an aquarium that encircled the center of the room so you could stand on the middle and watch as they swam right above me. I started going there after school and pretty soon purchased a cheap little 20 gallon for about 50 bucks. I made so many mistakes and had such a hard time getting it started I almost gave up. I finally managed to get the first fish inside after 2 months of waiting for it to cycle. I had a very basic setup: a backpack filter and a 50/50 light, that's it. However, about 5 years later and after having success with this tank my dad found out that the best aquarist in town was retiring and was basically giving his aquariums away. He purchased a 75 gallon for him and I received his old 40 gallon as an upgrade and I worked for that for about a year. Later when I was 16 my dad got me a job at the best aquarium store in town by telling them that I was an avid aquarists and they hired me after letting me work there for awhile as a temporary hired cleaning hand. About 3-4 months after I'd been working there a gorgeous aquarium came through that a man who was moving had brought in to trade for what we could offer him. I watched it for a month wondering why nobody had asked me about it, my boss only wanted $1200 dollars for the tank which happened to be a 150 gallon oak stand aquarium with a sump and twin halide lights, (see where I'm going with this) everything I couldn't afford but wanted so badly. So, about another week later and about 3 weeks until my 17th birthday I came home on Saturday after running errands. And I saw my boss’s delivery truck sitting outside of my house and he and the other store hand were unloading something. I promptly got out of my car to ask what they were doing there; no sooner had I asked that they rolled (you guessed it) the gorgeous aquarium that I had been admiring since the day I saw it. When I asked what it was doing here my boss replied “your dad wanted me to give you this for your birthday”. This remains the greatest birthday gift I've ever received. I also had the heaviest workload from this aquarium, for example having to buff the cracks out of the acrylic and then reinforce my floor to withstand the substantial weight, also, not to mention getting the thing up the stairs. And, this is where I am now the tank is about 1 year old now and doing fantastic.

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