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State: California
Country: United States
Description: 125 gallon with custom oak canopy and stand. 4 filters (running around 2000 gph filtration) including: one 100 gallon/405 gph rated Fluval canister filter and two 75 gallon Penguin biowheels. Two Neptune 200 watt heaters, 48'' aerator with 60 gallon pump, 120lbs of gravel, natural rock, misc artificial plants and roots.,
Advice: Stresszyme and Melafix can be your best friend.Make friends with a crazy old man named Waldo; he'll hook you up.
Fish Kept: South American Cichlids: two Tigers Oscars, two Jack Dempseys, one Green Terror. Misc fish include: 2 spotted plekos, 2 Black Ghost Knives
Corals/Plants: artificial
Tank Size: 125 gallons
Quote: If you meet Buddha on the road, kill him.
About Yourself: I am a veterinary technician/rx/holistic assistant. I have a saltwater reef tank as well. The other party involved likes to get his hands dirty and works at a skate shop. He also has a small Ram Cichlid/Neon Tetra tank. We have had this particular tank running for about a month and a half now after combining two 55 gallon tanks. The biggest Oscar in here is about 11 inches long. The Green Terror is female and lays eggs every month.

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