Brown Residue AGAIN!

9 posts

Discuss all topics related to freshwater and planted tanks.


fishrookie
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jul 17, 2009 6:05 am

Brown Residue AGAIN!

by fishrookie

I can't believe how much time we have spent on this tank. It may be coincidence, but ever since we took a Pet Store's advice to add a small bit of salt to our tank, we can not get rid of a brown, rusty looking residue that covers the plastic plants and tank side walls. It worsens with each passing day.

we have performed several tank changes (25%, 50%, 75%), cleaned and re-cleaned plants, rocks and even gravel just for the brown residue to return.

what the heck is this stuff?? i will add pictures soon.


TigerTaylor8906
 
Posts: 75
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2009 6:05 pm

by TigerTaylor8906

I have gone through this with one of my tanks, I think its a type of algea, of course I may be wrong. But, I just made my regular water changes a little larger than normal and just let it work itself out which it did in maybe a month, month and a half. How long have you been fighting with this? Again, that may not be the ideal way to go about it but it worked for me, havent had brown algea since. Good luck.


fishrookie
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jul 17, 2009 6:05 am

by fishrookie

Sounds like we're on the same wavelength. that is what we've been doing, but it has been a lot of work.

I would like to know what caused it so we can prevent it from happening again!

Thanks!


dizzcat
 
Posts: 648
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 2:30 am

by dizzcat

Its a brown algae that is very common in newly established tanks. The more mature a tank gets the less it grows. The only way to get rid of it is to manually remove it. Wipe it off the glass, plants and decorations and keep up with the water changes.

What kind of fish do you have? Most all do not need salt at all.


fishrookie
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jul 17, 2009 6:05 am

by fishrookie

Well, i guess we're doing all we can do. It does seem to be getting better, and glad to know that it has to do with the fact that we have only been at this for a about six months. We have a Rainbow Shark, Guarami, Red Glass Barb, Tiger Barb, and a Silver Dollar. Our newest addition is a Bala Shark.

Thanks for your input.


zambize
 
Posts: 401
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 9:14 pm

by zambize

Where have you been getting your research from, or who has been advising you? Your mix of fish is not going to get along. You'll also need a very, very large tank....and it's not a basically good setup. Tiger Barbs MUST be in groups of 6 or more or they'll turn real nasty and fin nip everything in sight and Bala Sharks need to school in groups of 6 or more....just to comment on a couple of your selections! And your Bala Shark is going to be a foot long soon. Oh, and you can't mix sharks. They all must be very young right now if they are all currently getting along. You'll have a real mess on your hands as they all mature. You must do research before you buy.

Z


dizzcat
 
Posts: 648
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 2:30 am

by dizzcat

I agree with Z, I shudder at your fish mix! How big is your tank? The only fish in there that will stay under 4" is the Tiger Barb, maybe the Gourami (depending on what kind).

Tiger Barbs are very nippy and that poor Gourami is going to suffer badly for it. Red Glass barbs get to be over 5" and are classified as aggressive.

Rainbow Sharks get big, mine is only 6 months old and over 6". They also get aggressive as heck too. Gets over 6" and needs at least a 50 gallon tank. It will be aggressive to all tank mates, but killing aggressive to other sharks.

Bala Sharks get huge and they will fight very badly with the Rainbow for territory in time. Minimum tank size recommended is 70 gallons. They get to be at least 1 1/2 FEET long.

Silver Dollars need to be kept in groups of at least 6 and they get to be over 8" as adults.

If you have a tank under a 55 I would highly suggest returning the Tiger Barb, both Sharks and Silver dollars and rethinking your stock. All fish in the store are just babies and babies usually get along fine because they have not hit sexual maturity. But once they do, all bets are off!

Look up the fish you have and the ones you may want before you buy. Here is a good site to start with:
http://www.badmanstropicalfish.com/profile.html


fishrookie
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jul 17, 2009 6:05 am

by fishrookie

I'm in shock. I thought I could trust a national pet store chain to help start our first fish experience. How could they not train their staff to advise on such issues? We asked questions and listened to the stores' advice.

The store categorized the fish by aggressiveness. All the fish we purchased were "semi-aggressive". The only major issue, according to the staff, was to wait until a nitrate cycle was complete before adding the Bala.

We were not informed of any "schooling" needs for the fish, and the golden rule we were told for size was 1" of fish per gallon, which we adhered to.

I would never have imagined I needed another college degree in order to raise 6 freshwater fish.


Tmercier834747
 
Posts: 887
Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2008 8:33 pm

by Tmercier834747

most ''pet store'' employees are given the impression that all species given the same classification (ie, semi-aggressive) will co-exist without any trouble, which is all so very stupid. That is of course if they're given any impression at all from management, or if they're just giving advice based on assumption.

I'd seriously consider consulting the management there and showing them you desire to return at least several of your fish in exchange for store credit, citing that you were given poor and unkknowlegable advice from their staff.

''Tropical community'' fish are generally regarded as the ''most safe'' fish to keep in addition to others from the same category. Though there are fish given this label that can be pretty unruly and stress others to death if not kept in the right numbers. Red Minor Serpae tetras are a good example. I kept 3 and they stressed my first German Blue Ram to death. They should really be kept in more numbers just as Z has said about the tiger barbs. This causes them to focus more on each other and even out aggression amongst themselves.

So should you consider to go with a semi-aggressive setup (which you seem to favor), research each fish individually to see what will go together, what numbers they should be kept in, and who will probably outgrow your tank.

I can promise you what you have now won't work out in the long run.

As for the brown stuff as the others said it will go away in time.

Brown Residue AGAIN!

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